Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman Supported Birth in America

Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman Supported Birth in America documents the development of the doula role as a newly emerging occupational niche within maternity care. It examines how the doula role evolved from a cultural practice of women-attended childbirth to a largely paid care-giving occupation.  It describes why women become doulas, the meanings they give to their experiences, and how they negotiate the dilemmas embedded within doula practice. Sociologist Christine Morton analyzes the meanings and dilemmas of the doula role for doulas and their organizations from interviews with doulas during her research.   The personal narratives, edited by Elayne Clift, are provided as a complement to the chapters offering sociological insights on doula care based on doulas’ stories. The main goals of the book are to provide a history of doulas, capture current experience and meaning of doula care, and to encourage critical reflection on the doula’s place in maternity care, today and in the future.

Coming soon from Praeclarus Press, estimated publication date January 2014

Published by Christine Morton

Christine H. Morton, PhD is a medical sociologist whose research has focused on women’s reproductive experiences and maternity care roles. Since 2008, she has been at Stanford University’s California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, where she conducts research on maternal mortality and morbidity.

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